Neighbourhood Watch

This message is being broadcast on behalf of Action Fraud

Following the ransomware cyber attack on Friday 12 May which affected the NHS and is believed to have affected other organisations globally, the City of London Police’s National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has issued an alert urging both individuals and businesses to follow protection advice immediately and in the coming days.

Ransomware is a form of malicious software (Malware) that enables cyber criminals to remotely lock down files on your computer or mobile device. Criminals will use ransomware to extort money from you (a ransom), before they restore access to your files. There are many ways that ransomware can infect your device, whether it be a link to a malicious website in an unsolicited email, or through a security vulnerability in a piece of software you use.

Key Protect messages for businesses to protect themselves from ransomware:

Install system and application updates on all devices as soon as they become available.

Install anti-virus software on all devices and keep it updated.

Create regular backups of your important files to a device that isn’t left connected to your network as any malware infection could spread to that too.

The National Cyber Security Centre’s technical guidance includes specific software patches to use that will prevent uninfected computers on your network from becoming infected with the “WannaCry” Ransomware: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/ransomware-latest-ncsc-guidance

For additional in-depth technical guidance on how to protect your organisation from ransomware, details can be found here: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/protecting-your-organisation-ransomware

Key Protect advice for individuals:

Install system and application updates on all devices as soon as they become available.

Install anti-virus software on all devices and keep it updated.

Create regular backups of your important files to a device (such as an external hard drive or memory stick) that isn’t left connected to your computer as any malware infection could spread to that too.

Only install apps from official app stores, such as Google’s Play Store, or Apple’s App Store as they offer better levels of protection than some 3rd party stores. Jailbreaking, rooting, or disabling any of the default security features of your device will make it more susceptible to malware infections.

Phishing/smishing

Fraudsters may exploit this high profile incident and use it as part of phishing/smishing campaigns. We urge people to be cautious if they receive any unsolicited communications from the NHS. The protect advice for that is the following:

An email address can be spoofed. Don’t open attachments or click on the links within any unsolicited emails you receive, and never respond to emails that ask for your personal or financial details.

The sender’s name and number in a text message can be spoofed, so even if the message appears to be from an organisation you know of, you should still exercise caution, particularly if the texts are asking you to click on a link or call a number.

Don’t disclose your personal or financial details during a cold call, and remember that the police and banks will never ring you and ask you to verify your PIN, withdraw your cash, or transfer your money to another “safe” account.

If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, please report it to Action Fraud at http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This message is being broadcast on behalf of Suffolk Trading Standards

We've had many reports of traders going door to door across the County offering to sell chainsaws and generators. Reports have been received in Ipswich, Stowmarket and Beccles.

Please be especially cautious of any individual who approaches you and offers to sell you something at a incredibly reduced price. 

Trust your instincts – If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is!

Anyone who is offered goods for sale out the back of a van, by a person who approaches them in the street, or uninvited at the doorstep, should be highly suspicious. Goods sold in this way may be stolen, counterfeit, unsafe or simply overpriced.

Our advice is simply never to deal with traders in this way.

Anyone who is suspicious of goods offered for sale in this way should report the matter to Suffolk police by contacting the number 101, or by calling us via the Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 04 05 06.

The Met Police has published an interesting booklet called the Little Book of Big Scams which gives details of a variety of scams. To download the booklet, please click here

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Police are releasing CCTV images of a woman officers would like to speak to in connection with a fraud where £12,500 was stolen from a bank account.

A woman went to one branch of a bank to request a new debit card and then went to another to request a new PIN. Both were sent to the account holder’s home address, without her knowledge, but appear to have been intercepted.

The new bank card and PIN were then used at branches of the bank in Ipswich, Bury St Edmunds and Newmarket on the same day with thousands of pounds being withdrawn on each occasion.

While the customer has been compensated by bank, police are keen to speak to the woman pictured in connection with the fraud. She is described as white, of slim build, possibly in her 50s to 60s, with below shoulder length brown hair. Please see attached for the images.

Anyone who may recognise her is asked to call Bury St Edmunds CID by dialling Suffolk Police on 101, quoting crime number 69501/16.

 

The following message is being sent on behalf of Action Fraud – the UK’s national fraud and cyber crime reporting centre

Action Fraud has received several reports from victims who have been sent convincing looking emails claiming to be from Amazon. The spoofed emails from “service@amazon.co.uk” claim recipients have made an order online and mimic an automatic customer email notification.

The scam email claims recipients have ordered an expensive vintage chandelier. Other reported examples include: Bose stereos, iPhone’s and luxury watches.

The emails cleverly state that if recipients haven’t authorised the transaction they can click on the help centre link to receive a full refund. The link leads to an authentic-looking website, which asks victims to confirm their name, address, and bank card information.

Amazon says that suspicious e-mails will often contain: 

• Links to websites that look like Amazon.co.uk, but aren't Amazon.co.uk.

• Attachments or prompts to install software on your computer.

• Typos or grammatical errors.

• Forged (or spoofed) e-mail addresses to make it look like the e-mail is coming from Amazon.co.uk.

Amazon will never ask for personal information to be supplied by e-mail.

You can read more about identifying suspicious emails claiming to be from Amazon by visiting https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201489210

To report a fraud or cyber crime, call Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or visit www.actionfraud.police.uk

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